Find those cool and cozy spots that locals like and missing the tourist traps

MONUMENTS

Expore Beautiful monument in Zagreb

FESTIVALS

Latest information about major music, cultural, regional festivals

HELP & INFO

Public Transport, Currency, free WiFi, mobile providers …

coffee-and-drinks
food-and-more
museum-and-galleries
sport-and-fun
jazz-club
historic-buildings
youtubers
accommodation

ZAGRE(A)BI ZAGREB

Zagreb is the capital and the largest city of Croatia. It is located in the northwest of the country, along the Sava river, at the southern slopes of the Medvednica mountain. Zagreb lies at an elevation of approximately 122 m (400 ft) above sea level. The estimated population of the city in 2018 is 810,003. The population of the Zagreb urban agglomeration is about 1.1 million, approximately a quarter of the total population of Croatia.

In Croatian folk etymology, the name of the city has been derived from either the verb za-grab-, meaning “to scoop” or “to dig”. One folk legend illustrating this derivation ties the name to a drought of the early 14th century, during which Augustin Kažotić (c. 1260–1323) is said to have dug a well which miraculously produced water. In another legend, a city governor is thirsty and orders a girl named Manda to “scoop” water from Manduševac well (nowadays a fountain in Ban Jelačić Square), using the imperative: zagrabi, Mando! (“Scoop, Manda!”).

ZAGRE(A)BI ZAGREB

Zagreb is the capital and the largest city of Croatia. It is located in the northwest of the country, along the Sava river, at the southern slopes of the Medvednica mountain. Zagreb lies at an elevation of approximately 122 m (400 ft) above sea level. The estimated population of the city in 2018 is 810,003. The population of the Zagreb urban agglomeration is about 1.1 million, approximately a quarter of the total population of Croatia.

In Croatian folk etymology, the name of the city has been derived from either the verb za-grab-, meaning “to scoop” or “to dig”. One folk legend illustrating this derivation ties the name to a drought of the early 14th century, during which Augustin Kažotić (c. 1260–1323) is said to have dug a well which miraculously produced water. In another legend, a city governor is thirsty and orders a girl named Manda to “scoop” water from Manduševac well (nowadays a fountain in Ban Jelačić Square), using the imperative: zagrabi, Mando! (“Scoop, Manda!”).

jelacic-plavi-110

ZAGREB HISTORY

The city is divided into three parts:

  • the thousand-year old Gornji grad (Upper Town) which contains the Presidential Palace, the iconic St Mark’s Church, the Croatian parliament, many museums and galleries which are all set in cobbled streets lit by gas lamps
  • the 19th century Donji grad (Lower Town) with its shops, restaurants, cafes, theatres and parks
  • modern post-World War II area of Novi Zagreb (‘new Zagreb’) which is full of high-rise buildings and basically has little to offer visitors.
zagreb-3

10 reasons why Zagreb

za-naslov

Local produce

Croatian beer and wine

Historic Upper Town

Quirky museums

Nearby natural retreats

Croatian coffee culture

Its intriguing cityscape

A feast of festivals

Atmosphere is relaxed

It’s cheap

Zagreb is an exciting and dynamic city

Croatian people are friendly and outgoing

Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.